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Archive for the ‘Financing Sustainability’ Category

By Dennis J. Neumann, Public Information Director, United Tribes Technical College (This article appears in the February, 2013 issue of The ACUPCC Implementer and was originally published in the December/January 2013 edition of United Tribes News)

ACUPCC ImplementerUnited Tribes Technical College used National Sustainability Day, October 24, to raise awareness and boost participation in the college’s recycling program. For a number of years campus departments have recycled paper and plastic under the leadership of a small but committed group of faculty members. Two years ago, interest in sustainability grew when United Tribes President David M. Gipp signed the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). The document outlines concerns about global climate change and offers methods for higher education institutions to model ways of minimizing the effects, showing leadership and integrating sustainability on campuses around the country. Institutions that sign-on commit their best efforts to pursue climate neutrality: By developing an institutional plan; initiating action to reduce greenhouse gases; and publicly reporting progress reports to the ACUPCC Reporting System.

Green Committee

Spearheading the United Tribes effort is the college’s Green Committee. An informal ‘green committee’ existed on the campus for many years; its dedicated volunteers primarily devoted their labor to campus beautification. Now ‘green’ has a different hue. It’s work is directed from within the Student and Campus Services division and the members are tasked with addressing the substantial challenges associated with the climate commitment. The campus-wide recycling drive is one of their initiatives and is aimed at lowering the campus carbon footprint.

Organized Recycling

UTTC

Pitching in is United Tribes pre-schooler Kiiana Wells, 2, and her mother Shealynn Wells (Blackfeet), a UTTC Nursing student. Both took part in a campus-wide recycling drive October 24 on National Sustainability Day. Led by the campus “Green Committee,” the college is placing more emphasis on recycling as part of its commitment to sustainability.

UTTC’s campus-based population of 1,160 – including college students, staff, and youngsters – is of sufficient size that recycling requires organization and promotion. The October drive was promoted throughout campus with posters and electronic messages with the slogan: “Let’s Fill Our Bins to the Brim!” Participants were encouraged to begin using a regular system for collecting two, common recyclables: paper and plastic. The college would like to recycle as much as possible, including aluminum cans. Members of the Green Committee advised how to prepare and separate recyclables. They set up drop-off locations in main campus buildings where they placed recycling totes. And they invited the more engaged to take their recyclables directly to the large collection bins that were brightly painted with designs and words by youngsters from the college’s elementary school. The event also included a cook-out at the student union and presentations about campus sustainability and the work of the Green Committee.

Work Ahead

Since United Tribes agreed to the climate commitment in 2010, sustainability has taken on new importance in policy and practice. But the challenges associated with incorporating “Green Energy” are considerable. UTTC is located on the site of a former military post. Most of the brick and wood-frame buildings, constructed between 1900 and 1908, are poor examples of energy efficiency. Over the past decade, all remodeling and new construction has incorporated modern efficiencies, like ground-source heating, energy efficient windows and passive solar design. Signing the commitment and establishing the Green Committee, with representation from departments throughout the campus, signals that green energy is a central part of the college administration’s long-term strategic plan to grow the student population and expand the campus with new buildings and infrastructure.

According to Curtis Maynard, Facility Manager, the college is committed to green standards. New campus construction and renovations are planned and built with the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) LEED Silver standard as a guideline. The two most recent examples are a $1.1 million renovation and expansion of the college cafeteria and the $5.5 million construction of a science and technology building on the college’s new, south campus.

Green energy initiatives are moving forward on a number of fronts. The college has adopted an energy-efficient appliance policy, requiring the purchase of ENERGY STAR certified products that have that rating. Family student houses have received new appliances, along with new lighting and other energy efficient changes. A study is underway to compare the energy consumption of houses where retrofitted appliances are in service. Student tenants, and their family members, have been trained to identify good energy usage.

As the college upgrades its aging electrical service by changing-out overhead distribution lines to underground, new gas and electric metering is installed for individual buildings. Unfortunately, service to the original military fort did not include separate metering. Also being added are water meters. This will more closely identify consumption and costs. Staff and students in the college’s Tribal Environmental Science Program used a carbon calculator program to perform energy audits and that will help identify areas for improvement.

In terms of information and education, the college has hosted Sustainability Days and Earth Day observances. Guest experts have presented talks about energy efficient ideas and policies that can be incorporated on campus. The college has encouraged the use of public transportation; there is a city bus system stop a the college’s main entrance.

Clearly the Green Committee understands it has much work to do on sustainability. An important step just ahead is to file the college’s climate action plan with the ACUPCC by January 15, 2013. That planning work is underway now.

For more information about the United Tribes Green Committee and the college’s climate commitment, please contact Curtis Maynard, Facility Manager, S/CS, 701-255-3285 x 1638, cmaynard@uttc.edu.

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By Jacqueline J. Palmer, Facilities Coordinator, Bowie State University
(This article appears in the February, 2013 issue of The ACUPCC Implementer)

ACUPCC ImplementerBowie State University has undertaken several endeavors to go “green” and increase its sustainability through its Climate Control Commitment Committee (C4), not the least of which is its partnership with the Toyota Green Initiative to foster sustainable living and thinking among its students. The Toyota Green Initiative (TGI) is an environmental stewardship platform designed to empower Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) students and alumni on the benefits of adopting a sustainable lifestyle.   The success of a Bowie State University and TGI partnership is predicated on both entities’ keen focus on a partnership supported by engaged leadership, which in turn will foster enhanced sustainability awareness at Bowie State University.

By its nature a sustainable lifestyle necessitates a change in mindset, thus the acceptance of sustainability practices as routine requires leadership intervention and engagement. Further, the partnership will be foundational for fostering green practices targeting students, faculty and staff at the university.  It is within this vein that the launch of the TGI was held during the 2010 Homecoming at Bowie State University, the first stop in a cross-country HBCU tour through a partnership with the CIAA and the BET Black College Tour.

As with any institution, leaders must model the way for their followers. In this regard, Bowie State University President Mickey L. Burnim, and Dr. Karl Brockenbrough, Vice President for Administration and Finance, were on hand to welcome John Ridgeway, corporate manager of Toyota Financial Services, and participate in the ribbon-cutting ceremony opening the BSU greenhouse in December 2012.  In addition to serving as a learning forum for BSU students specifically and the campus community generally, the greenhouse now serves as a conservatory for nurturing and cultivating flowers for future planting as part of the campus landscape.

The ribbon-cutting ceremony was a precursor to a one day, fully immersive TGI event held at Bowie State University, President Burnim and his cabinet members were actively involved in the student-focused lecture series, recycling and other activities relating to sustainability as a way of life, and a greenhouse re-planting activity undertaken during the event. Student groups separated and replanted 87 day lilies and 16 irises, which will yield upward of 250 perennials in the spring for replanting as part of the campus landscape. The outcome of these efforts will serve to decrease the carbon footprint of the campus.

Student involvement in the TGI recycle portion of the event yielded upward of 7,000 pounds or over 3 tons of recyclable materials to include:

  • Plastic: 5,365 lbs.
  • Aluminum: 1,172 lbs.
  • Paper: 367 lbs.
  • Clothing: 21 lbs.
  • Glass: 267 lbs.

The TGI team reported that the recycle drive at Bowie State University resulted in the highest amount of items collected from any particular HBCU during our 2012 campus tour.  The successful generation of recyclable material at Bowie State University is unsurprising given that the university has participated in the National Recyclemania competition for the past six years. In addition, the C4 committee, led by Dr. Brockenbrough, has been instrumental in staging Earth Day, Recycle Week, and lectures to move the Bowie State University community toward adopting sustainability as a way of life.  These efforts, coupled with the burgeoning TGI partnership, are serving to foster purposefulness in attaining and sustaining green sensibility.

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By Michele Madia, Director of Sustainability Financing & Strategy, Second Nature
(This article appears in the November, 2012 issue of The ACUPCC Implementer)

ACUPCC ImplementerNo matter what the outcome of the presidential election, Congress will undoubtedly consider comprehensive tax reform in the New Year. Second Nature, the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) and the National Association of College & University Business Officers (NACUBO) are presenting policy options for changes in tax policy and federal grant programs that would allow colleges and universities to increase operational efficiencies, reduce long-term energy expenses and ultimately contribute to administrative efforts to contain costs.

The report, Higher Education: Leading the Nation to a Safe and Secure Energy Future was released at the ACUPCC Climate

Luther College generates one-third of the electrical power it consumes with a wind generator sited on the bluff overlooking the campus and city.
Photo: Erik Hageness

Leadership Summit in Washington, DC this past summer, explores how the federal government can develop and enhance clean energy incentives and investments specifically for colleges and universities. To publicize the report and proposals, Second Nature hosted a press briefing with higher education reporters. Several college presidents participated in the event with media representatives from the Chronicle of Higher Education and the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC). Stories about the report appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education, ClimateWire, and in AACC’s Community College Times.

In early October, Second Nature and NACUBO hosted a meeting with representatives from government relations staff at higher education associations (HEA) and from individual institutions to educate them about the shared effort. David Hales, in his first visit to Washington DC as Second Nature’s new president, participated in the meeting and had the opportunity to connect with key staff from the presidential associations.  The goals for the meeting were to:

  • Educate association colleagues about Second Nature’s work
  • Engage the higher education associations in dialog about the strategic importance of energy issues (HEAs are primarily focused on student aid, access, and research funding)
  • Enlist additional volunteers to participate in meetings going forward

Participants included representatives from: Association of American Universities (AAU), Association of Public Land-grant Universities (APLU), University of California, Irvine, University of Colorado, Ball State University, Portland State University, Michigan State University, University of Washington, University of Pennsylvania, and the University of California Office of the President.

Technical Correction to the Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Deduction (Section 179D)

Second Nature has been involved in another effort to advocate for public policy initiatives that are consistent with the ACUPCC mission.  We have identified a current legislative issue that would benefit all higher education institutions and all nonprofits that may be considering new construction or building retrofits that generate energy savings.

The specific issue described here in more detail involves a federal tax deduction for energy efficiency projects. Currently nonprofits, including independent colleges and universities are excluded from benefiting from this deduction.  Supporters of an amendment extending the deduction to nonprofits have indicated that letters of support from influential and respected voices addressed to targeted members of Congress would be helpful in getting the amendment added to the “tax extenders bill” during the lame duck session of Congress in November.

Second Nature took action and identified eight signatory institutions in key legislative districts, and requested that presidents send a letter of support to their member of Congress.

Since 2005, there has been a deduction for buildings that meet a certain threshold of energy savings (new construction or renovation).  This is a technology neutral tax incentive that encourages energy conservation by tying the value of the deduction to the actual energy savings generated by the building once it is completed. The deduction may be up to $1.80 per square foot, with qualifying energy efficient improvements in lighting systems, heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water systems, and the building envelope.

To help ensure that governmental owners get the most efficient systems yielding long-term operating savings, Section 179D permits a government building owner (including public institutions) to allocate the 179D deduction to one or more persons “primarily responsible for designing the property,” – this party can include architects, engineers, contractors, environmental consultants, or energy services providers.  The statute does not now allow nongovernmental nonprofits to allocate this deduction, although there is no legislative history indicating that this is intentional.

The benefit to the overall economy from permitting major sectors like higher education and hospitals to allocate the Sec. 179D tax deduction for energy efficiency construction and retrofit projects to the designers, engineers, construction firms, and architects involved with such projects will be considerable. Being able to include such a deduction in building construction or retrofit RFPs should lead to lower bids. Institutions would be incentivizing architects, engineers, and contractors to push the envelope on available energy savings, resulting in lower operating costs for years to come.  There is bipartisan support for the current law because of the savings it can generate and federal agencies have been encouraged to maximize their use of the allocation authority. Extending this benefit to higher education and to hospitals would help to save money in this capital and budget constrained economy, maximize the return on energy efficiency investments, and support the commitments made by ACUPCC institutions to help eliminate operational greenhouse gas emissions.

Second Nature will keep the network informed about both the technical correction to 179D, and about our national policy strategy more broadly. To get involved, or learn more, contact Michele Madia, Director, Sustainability Finance & Strategy mmadia@secondnature.org.

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By Howard Wertheimer, Director, Capital Planning & Space Management, Georgia Institute of Technology
(This article appears in the November, 2012 issue of The ACUPCC Implementer)

ACUPCC ImplementerGeorgia Tech is committed to the development of a sustainable campus community, creating distinctive architecture and open spaces. In keeping with this goal, Georgia Tech has a clear mission for its new Carbon Neutral Energy Solutions Laboratory Building: carbon neutral net zero site energy use. The 40,000 square foot facility is intended to set a new standard for sustainable design for laboratory buildings of this type by optimizing passive energy technologies, reducing electricity loads, thoughtful day-lighting strategies, water conservation and harvesting, and maximizing the use of renewable energy, including a 290kW photovoltaic array.

Rendition of GT’s Carbon Neutral Energy Solutions Laboratory

The building will be anchored by Georgia Tech’s Strategic Energy Institute and will house a variety of energy research programs requiring large scale (high-bay) and intermediate scale (mid-bay) capabilities, and the design is intended to express its mission simply, directly and honestly; a “no frills” design. The building took advantage of innovative planning models that go beyond flexibility and adaptability, introducing the mid-bay laboratory concept for large-scale equipment that requires slab-on-grade space, without the necessity of a 30’ tall high bay.  The building also challenged conventional energy use assumptions, and developed the energy model based on a net-zero energy approach. Through analyses of contemporary carbon neutral buildings, establishing a working definition of net zero site energy use, incorporating baseline energy modeling and studying simple pre- industrial structures, the design team created a series of four alternative building concepts. These were evaluated through energy-modeling to determine which options and which energy-savings features to pursue.

The U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) awarded the Georgia Tech Research Corporation $11.6 million to construct the Carbon-Neutral Energy Solutions Laboratory (C-NES). As one of 12 recipients of the NIST award, the project has a total budget of $24.6 million. The balance of the project was financed through GT Facilities Inc., a 501c3 affiliate partner of the Georgia Institute of Technology.

The project has already received national recognitions, with awards from the New Jersey AIA, the Georgia AIA, the Georgia chapter of the ASLA, and Southern Region of ENR’s Magazine for best Green Building.

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By Mieko A. Ozeki, Sustainability Projects Coordinator, University of Vermont
(This article appears in the November, 2012 issue of The ACUPCC Implementer)

ACUPCC ImplementerHow significant a role can campus-based renewable energy play in the University of Vermont’s (UVM) progress towards carbon neutrality?

Back in 2011 this question spurred the University of Vermont’s Clean Energy Fund to award up to $100,000 toward a Comprehensive Campus Renewable Energy Feasibility Study (CCREFS). The intent of the study was to generate scenarios to aid in renewable energy planning at UVM by getting a broad view of the potential for these technologies on-campus. The outcome of this study will also help to inform meeting UVM’s Climate Action Plan first target of becoming carbon neutral with our purchased electricity by 2015.

The funding for the CCREFS project was primarily sourced from UVM’s Clean Energy Fund (CEF), a student green fund approved in 2008 by UVM’s Board of Trustees. The CEF is sustained by a self-imposed student fee of $10 per student per semester and generates an estimated $225,000 per year. The fund was created in response to students’ desire to have UVM advance renewable energy research, education, and infrastructure on campus. To date, the CEF has awarded funding to twenty projects including the development of an internship program, CEF graduate fellowship, and lecture/workshop series.

The idea for this study began in 2009 and was proposed during the 2010-2011 funding cycle to the CEF Committee, an 11-member group predominantly composed of students with representation from alumni, faculty, and staff. The project was recommended by the CEF Committee and approved by the Vice President of Finance & Administration, Richard Cate, in Spring 2011. With the concept approved, the Office of Sustainability and Capital Planning & Management worked together on a Request for Proposal (RFP) for an outside firm to conduct the analysis. We looked to other institutions that had conducted a comprehensive campus renewable energy feasibility study; to our surprise we found few institutions that had carried out studies at this scale and beyond site specific and/or technology specific studies. It was through outreach to the GRNSCHL listserv that we learned that the University of Connecticut (UConn) was beginning a “preliminary siting and feasibility study for installing various forms of on-campus renewable/sustainable energy generation.” Rich Miller shared UConn’s RFP for their Renewable Energy Strategic Plan, which helped us develop the wording as well as identify the goals and deliverables for the project.

The overarching goal of the CCREFS was to get recommendations for optimal renewable energy site locations on the University’s main campus in the City of Burlington (459 acres), and on south campus, located in the City of South Burlington (495 acres). The RFP identified three deliverables:

  1. Feasibility Study: a strategic campus renewable energy plan that included an assessment of the opportunities for the following renewable energy technologies: solar (thermal and photovoltaic), wind (ground mounted and building integrated), geothermal, biofuels and biomass, and fuel cells. We wanted the assessment to provide an overall maximum capacity of renewable energy potential of the UVM campus and recommendations that could be phased in to accommodate successive carbon neutrality goals. In addition, we wanted to determine the most appropriate renewable energy technologies for the University’s geographic location and climatic conditions as well as identify the optimal location of these technologies.
  2. Map: a visual representation of all potential installation locations divided into layers for each individual technology; and file formats (GIS and KML) for future planning or outreach use.
  3. Student involvement: an opportunity for student interns to gain professional experience and knowledge on renewable energy technologies.

The student internship component was modeled around an internship/consultant collaboration at Pomona College. Pomona hired a team of interns, who received training from the consultants to collect information for their sustainability audit. It is imperative for us to include students in the projects that they fund and to provide them with practical, professional development experience to prepare them for employment.

The RFP was released in Spring 2012 and attracted fifteen firms, resulting in nine proposal submissions. Clough, Harbour & Associates (CHA) was selected to conduct the study. The Office of Sustainability hired five UVM student interns to observe, document, and analyze the CCREFS project and the installation of a 32-kW solar PV system. Three of the CEF interns worked directly with CHA, as a technical team, to conduct field surveys of buildings, parking lots, and open fields on the University’s main and south campus. The interns surveyed each renewable energy technology (focusing on solar, wind, and geothermal) for a period of 1-2 weeks and submitted data to CHA for analysis.  CHA in turn provided data from each renewable energy technology feasibility study to their GIS specialist to create map layers.

Two interns worked together as the media and outreach team. The media intern filmed, edited, and produced videos on the project. The outreach intern collected progress reports from the technical team and produced PR materials on the implementation of the project. The interns wrote bi-weekly blog posts, a reflection and presentation on their internship experience, and a PR narrative of the project process in addition to their project deliverables. The intent was for each intern to develop materials for their professional portfolios and to get them to reflect on their career paths.

Data collection, analysis, and map development concluded in early September. Now as the CEF enters its fourth Call for Ideas, our committee and key stakeholders are using the results of the CCREFS as a guideline for future installations and to review current project proposals. CHA concluded that UVM had optimal locations, reasonable payback, and incentives to implement solar PV, solar thermal, and geothermal on-campus. We expect this student investment in this feasibility study will pay off in our long-term energy planning and meeting our climate action plan goals. The CCREFS also provides more opportunities for research on renewable energy development in cold weather climate and is highly relevant to the smart grid implementation underway in Vermont.

To learn more about the CCREFS check out the following video produced by CEF intern Daniel Hopkins ’13 on the survey process and from the poster presentation at AASHE 2012.

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By Jennifer Hayward, Sustainability Coordinator & Anna Scott, Energy Analyst, Lane Community College
(This article appears in the November, 2012 issue of The ACUPCC Implementer)

ACUPCC ImplementerLane Community College established a revolving loan fund in 2006, the only one of its kind at a community college, to pay for energy conservation and renewable energy projects through utility carryover. The fund, called the Energy Carryover Fund, realizes savings when current year electricity and natural gas expenditures are less than current year budget. Additionally, rebates and other incentives for energy-focused projects can be deposited into the Fund, helping to finance more projects in the future. The Fund is managed and implemented by Lane’s full time Energy Analyst, Anna Scott, and currently stands at $122,000.

Annual budgets for electricity and natural gas are determined using an energy use index calculation for the baseline year of 2004-05 and the current year’s prices.  Money is transferred to the Carryover Fund if Lane is purchasing less energy per square foot because of efficiency, conservation, and on-site renewables than in the baseline year.

Lane’s Energy Analyst plans the Fund’s projects in collaboration with faculty and students in its Energy Management and

Lane’s Solar Station provides electricity for charging vehicles and power for nearby buildings.

Renewable Energy Technology degree programs, Facilities Management and Planning staff, and college administrators, under the leadership of President Mary Spilde, a nationally known advocate for sustainability, and past member of the steering committee for the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment.

In 2006, when the Fund was first set up, Lane created a spreadsheet that listed twenty-one projects to be completed over six years.  Each project listed the estimated cost, rebates or incentives that may be available to help offset the cost, projected annual energy savings in MMBTUs and in dollars, and net dollar savings over the six year period.  Using this spreadsheet, the college could plan projects several years out and have a reasonable projection of the Fund balance into the future.  These projects included lighting retrofits, commissioning, and solar electric installations.

This system worked well for several years, but was temporarily put on hold because of an opportunity to use state stimulus, bond, and grant funds to implement projects. Thanks to prior planning, the college had shovel ready projects and was able to capture state stimulus funds for building-level sub-metering for electricity, natural gas, and water, new better-insulated roofs, an exterior lighting upgrade, and a solar thermal system that provides domestic hot water for Lane’s commercial laundry, showers, and two buildings.  Lane’s voter-approved 2008 bond levy provides funding for such energy efficiency projects as heat recovery systems for the college’s laundry facility and data center plus $830,000 for renewable energy projects.  A $100,000 renewable energy grant from Lane’s utility provider coupled with bond funds for renewable energy allowed the college to build a 43 kilowatt solar array with 19 solar-powered electric vehicle charging stations.

Busy implementing projects funded by these state, bond, and grant funds, college staff have only used the revolving loan fund in a very limited capacity for several years.  However, implementation of these projects is beginning to wrap up and the college is moving back into using the revolving loan fund.  Lane is a charter member of the Billion Dollar Green Challenge, which encourages colleges and other organizations to invest in self-managed revolving loan funds that finance energy efficiency improvements.  As Lane has started its second round of planning for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects, the resources associated with joining the Challenge have proven invaluable.  One of these resources is a streamlined web-based Green Revolving Investment Tracking System that will be used in lieu of the original spreadsheet planning and tracking system.

Investing in energy efficiency using utility savings is an excellent model that any college can use.  Lane encourages all ACUPCC member institutions to establish a green revolving loan fund, join the Billion Dollar Challenge, and begin using the resources offered to Challenge participants such as the Green Revolving Investment Tracking System.  Lane’s revolving loan fund alone will not get the college all the way to carbon neutrality, but it will get the college part way there, and the planning that is required for the Fund has allowed Lane to take advantage of unforeseen opportunities that have skyrocketed its greenhouse gas reduction efforts.

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The State of Renewables in Higher Education

This webcast was broadcast on November 29th 2012, 2:00-3:00pm EST

Supporting Documents

Second Nature and the U.S. EPA’s Green Power Partnership are collaborating to identify the barriers to expanding renewable energy use among colleges and universities, identify solutions, provide education and training on green power procurement strategies and explore the possibilities of joint purchasing opportunities.

To kick-off this partnership, Second Nature and EPA invite you to participate in an interactive event to learn more about trends and possibilities in colleges and universities incorporation of green power onto their campuses, and in their climate reduction goals.

The live event will stream on this page.  Please bookmark this link and register to participate in the event.

Leaning Objectives:

  • Understand the environmental, financial, and non-tangible benefits of procuring renewable electricity
  • Gain a better understanding of the challenges being faced by institutions trying to purchase or produce green power
  • Assess the current state of green power on campuses and potential for green power purchasing and production growth
  • Recognize the various procurement options for renewable electricity such as on-site generation, PPAs, project off-take arrangements, contracts for bundled or unbundled RECs
  • Identify new opportunities for learning and collaboration among institutions participating in the event

Webinar Panelists

  • David Hales, President, Second Nature
  • Blaine Collison, Program Director, Green Power Partnership, US EPA
  • Sarah Brylinsky, Program Associate, Second Nature
  • Jenn Andrews, Director of Program Planning and Coordination, Clean Air-Cool Planet
  • Anthony Amato, Senior Analyst, Energy and Climate Change, ERG

For more information or questions about this event, please contact info@secondnature.org.

About Second Nature
www.secondnature.org
Second Nature works to create a healthy, just, and sustainable society beginning with the transformation of higher education. Second Nature is the support organization of the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment.

About the EPA’s Green Power Partnership
www.epa.gov/greenpower 
The Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program that encourages organizations to buy green power as a way to reduce the environmental impacts associated with purchased electricity use. The Partnership currently has more than 1,300 Partner organizations voluntarily purchasing billions of kilowatt-hours of green power annually. Partners include a wide variety of leading organizations such as Fortune 500 companies, small and medium sized businesses, local, state, and federal governments, and colleges and universities.

_______

How to Participate

This event will be broadcast using Google+ Hangouts on Air to a live YouTube video. Please be sure to reserve a room or space which is equipped to screen YouTube videos.  You will not need a Google+ account to participate.  On the day of the event, this page (the page you are currently viewing) will have the YouTube video streaming live.  Simply visit this page to begin screening the video at 2pm EST. Please note that the video will be posted no earlier than 1:45pm EST the day of the event.  If you are having trouble seeing the video, try refreshing the page or restarting your browser.

Submitting Questions

We invite you to submit questions to the panelists ahead of time to help guide the discussion! Please leave a comment at the end of this post with your question for one or all of the panelists.

If you would like to submit questions and participate in the interactive components of this event during the event, you will need a Google or YouTube account.  To ask a question, click on the “Watch on YouTube” button in the lower right hand corner of the video window.  This will take you to the live video on the Second Nature YouTube Channel.  To ask a question, sign in to your Google or YouTube account, then post your question in the “Comments” section below the video.  Your question will appear instantly to the moderator.

Unable to make this live broadcast?
A recording of the broadcast will be made available shortly after the event on the Second Nature YouTube Channel, and on this blog.  Please register if you would like to receive information about the recording or live broadcast.

Technical Difficulties?
Questions about how to screen this event, or having difficulty?  Email info@secondnature.org.

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