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Posts Tagged ‘Fast Company’

by Rima Mulla, Communications Associate, Second Nature

American College & University Presidents' Climate CommitmentThe theme of the recently released American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment 2009 Annual Report carries through in the latest Second Nature article published by Fast Company: Leadership for a Thriving, Sustainable World.

Here’s an excerpt from the article by Second Nature President Anthony Cortese and Senior Fellow Georges Dyer:

“The Copenhagen negotiations in December failed to deliver a concrete, binding international treaty on climate disruption.  The Senate is at an impasse on creating meaningful federal legislation that can sufficiently address the climate challenge while rebuilding a better economy. […] But leadership happens at all levels within organizations and within communities. […] In the case of eliminating greenhouse gas emissions, colleges and universities have formed the tip of the spear, forging ahead towards climate neutrality. Through the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) network, 675 institutions have come together pledging to take immediate actions, create longer-term plans, and publicly report their progress toward net-zero emissions.”

Read more about how the US Higher Education sector is leading the way, here.

Second Nature has published four articles as part of Fast Company’s Inspired Ethonomics series:

Higher Education’s Purpose: A Healthy, Just, and Sustainable Society
Making a Sustainability Perspective Second Nature in Education
The Campus as Living Laboratory
Leadership for a Thriving, Sustainable World

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by Rima Mulla, Communications Associate, Second Nature

Image courtesy of Fast Company

Second Nature President Anthony Cortese and Senior Fellow Georges Dyer discuss “The Campus as Living Laboratory” in their latest web article for Fast Company’s Inspired Ethonomics series. They cite examples of institutions already benefiting from having adopted sustainable practices in their operations, and point to resources developed by Second Nature to move the higher education sector in this direction. Two of the resources highlighted were the Case for Investing in Improved Energy Performance on Campus document, developed in conjunction with the Clinton Climate Initiative, and the CampusGreenBuilder.com web portal, produced by our Advancing Green Building in Higher Education team, which helps under-resourced and minority-serving institutions build green.

Read the full article here. See our previous post about Second Nature’s Fast Company articles here.

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by Rima Mulla, Communications Associate, Second Nature

Image courtesy of Fast Company

Fast Company has published two compelling web articles written by Second Nature President Anthony Cortese and Senior Fellow Georges Dyer:

Higher Education’s Purpose: A Healthy, Just, and Sustainable Society. This excellent introduction to the concept of Education for Sustainability argues that higher education can and must play a transformative role in leading society toward a more sustainable future.

Making a Sustainability Perspective Second Nature in Education. This article cites several examples of higher education institutions tackling sustainability in the curriculum and addressing one of the most important questions of our time: How can we as a global society continue to develop and prosper on such a small planet?

Watch for two more articles from Tony and Georges, all of which are part of a Fast Company series entitled Inspired Ethonomics: Actionable Insights for World-Changing People and Businesses.

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